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EXTEND FALL CROPS WITH HEAVY DUTY ROW COVERS
Heavyweight material extends fall season by several weeks



Different Kinds Of Row Covers

First thing we need to do here is differentiate between a heavy row cover and a lightweight floating row cover.

A Row Cover - is usually a synthetic material, such as clear plastic (polyethylene) or spunbonded polyester. It is placed directly over rows of crops, and may or may not have, a supporting framework - often, on wire hoops to form a low tunnel. A row cover is usually left in place for several weeks.

A Floating row cover - is an extremely lightweight row cover fabric that can be placed directly over plants, without need for a supporting framework, instead being simply anchored to the ground against wind. More information about this below.

A Super-Light Insect Barrier - is a see-through, lightweight row cover that gives your plants excellent insect protection year-round. More information about this below.

Extending The Growing Season With Heavyweight Row Covers

In the fall, there is more protection by using row covers, because there is a larger reservoir of heat in the soil in the fall than in the spring.

Because of that excess heat in the soil, heavyweight row covers perform very well in protecting late-season tomatoes and peppers from early frosts.

They are also great for extending the growing season by several weeks for cool-weather crops such as carrots, lettuce, and spinach.

Heavyweight row covers are almost three times thicker than regular floating row covers, and will protect crops down to 24° F (-4.5 ° C).

They are fast and easy to put on, and with these row covers you can also plant your spring garden a week or two earlier with less risk of frost damage.

In milder areas these heavyweight covers will allow you to pick greens all winter.

The covers delay freezing of soil so you can leave carrots, turnips and other root crops in place and dig them as needed, well into icy weather, and they let 50% of sunlight pass through.

Most covers will last for several seasons, and you can extend their life by keeping the edges pinned securely in windy areas. When not in use, garden covers should be folded and stored away from sun and moisture.

After row covers become worn, you can reuse them in many ways:

1. Lay pieces of row covers over newly seeded lawns to prevent erosion of seed and soil

2. Place covers under bark mulch or soil to act as a weed barrier

3. Cover your favorite flowering annuals during cold fall nights to extend the growing season

For more information, or to purchase: Heavyweight Row Covers


Regular Floating Row Covers

Save yourself, and your plants tons of trouble, get some floating row covers today. They're fast to put up, inexpensive, and they save you so much time, effort and labor!

For more information, or to purchase:
Regular Floating Row Covers



Super-Light Insect Barrier

This super lightweight row cover gives your plants remarkable protection from insects all year long. The see-through fabric allows 95% of the sunlight in, but with little heat buildup, which means no harm to your heat-sensitive plants!

More information, or to purchase:
Super-Light Insect Barrier Information



 







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Gardening-tip:



Fertilize Container Plants

Because container gardens are usually grown to show off a lot color, the plants in them require more frequent fertilizing.

It's good to feed them every two weeks with a water-soluble complete fertilizer like a 20-20-20 or a hyrdolized fish fertilizer.

Regular feeding will help them fill in faster, and produce more flowers.


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