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Past Articles Library | Organic Pest Control | Neem Oil



NEEM OIL FOR PESTS


It seems like no matter what time of the year, insects abound, but there is a great organic solution available to keeping bugs in check.

Of course good gardening practices and proper crop rotation help, but sometimes you need a helping hand to keep your plants safe.

The neem tree, which has insecticidal properties and is native to India and Africa, produces seeds that have been used to repel insects and pests in stored grains and in gardens and homes for years.

Today, the extract of the neem tree seed is the active ingredient in Neem-Away Insect Spray. Neem-Away suppresses an insectís desire to feed and disrupts its hormonal balance so it dies before molting.

Field tests have shown Neem-Away to be effective against a wide range of insects from aphids and caterpillars to corn borer and squash bugs. Neem-Away will not harm beneficial insects such as lady beetles and lacewing.

Neem oil can be used on a broad range of insects on vegetables, fruits and nuts, flowers, trees and shrubs.

Apply when pests first appear to prevent damage. Repeat every 7-10 days as needed; regular spraying increases its effectiveness.



 








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Gardening-tip:



When to Harvest Squash

Winter squash is ready for harvest after the rind hardens and surface color dulls.

The vines will have dried and the skins are hard and can't be scratched with a fingernail.

Make sure you get them in before the first hard frost.


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