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Past Articles Library | Organic Pest Control | Homemade Marigold Spray



HOMEMADE MARIGOLD CALENDULA SPRAY
Organically repels chewing and leaf cutting insects


This homemade pesticide is super easy to make, and repels leaf cutting and chewing insects like:

  • Leaf cutting bees on your roses and lilacs

  • Asparagus beetles

  • Tomato hornworms

To make marigold calendula spray use Calendula officinalis commonly known as calendula, pot marigold, and English marigold.

Here's what you do:

1. Mash 1 cup (225 ml) of marigold leaves and flowers

2. Mix with 1 pint (500 ml) of water

3. Let soak for 24 hours

4. Strain through cheesecloth

5. Dilute further with 1 1/2 quarts (1.5 liter) of water then add 1/4 teaspoon (5 ml) of liquid castille soap **

6. Spray target areas

Any time you are using a new spray on your plants, make sure to spray on a test leaf first to make sure no damage to the foliage will take place.

** Castille soap is made exclusively from vegetable oil as opposed to animal fat. Castile soap is made exclusively, or predominantly, from olive, coconut, almond, hemp, or jojoba oils. Castille soap is commonly found in organic health food stores and online.



 








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Gardening-tip:



When to Harvest Squash

Winter squash is ready for harvest after the rind hardens and surface color dulls.

The vines will have dried and the skins are hard and can't be scratched with a fingernail.

Make sure you get them in before the first hard frost.


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